Redheart

Redheart

Introduction

 

Redheart is a distinctive Central / South American exotic tropical hardwood with uninteresting pink to moderately bright red colored wood fades considerably with long exposure to ultraviolet radiation. This is quite normal like several red-colored forms of wood, like Padauk and Bloodwood, Redheart can oxidize to a brown color unless it is protected by an ultraviolet light-blocking finish. Generally, it is characterized by a red base color — starting from uninteresting to bright pink, pinkish-red or red — with streaks and highlights numerous in color, from darker red tones to yellows, oranges, and even occasional purples. The heartwood and also the softwood of this tree are generally separated by a purple space. This wood includes a fine to a medium texture that makes it rather very easy to figure with each hand tools and with machines. Redheart is difficult lumber to dry, however once cured properly, it makes a lovely piece of furniture.

The grains present on the wood will vary from irregular to wild (although generally straight, also), and may typically be multi-dimensional or overlapping — typically to very dramatic impact, particularly once vibrant secondary colors are a gift. These contribute to some gorgeous patterns that the articles made of this wood tend to possess. Although it doesn't possess a lot of natural lusters. It works, turns, glues, and finishes well, as would be expected with the wood of its moderate density.

 

Despite Redheart’s rather moderate weight, hardness and density, the wood will burn simply once resawn, if blades and cutting tools are not sharp. Such burning produces a black tar-like resin that adheres to the wood’s surface and needs patient sanding.

With its generally gorgeous aesthetic qualities, Redheart has been a well-liked turning wood; it is starting to appear a lot of frequently in custom guitar building (necks, fretboards, etc.), also.

 

Commonly referred to as Chakte Kok (with a large number of variant spellings), this species has been antecedently placed within the Sickingia genus. Another species that’s additionally within the Rubiaceæ family is Cosmocalyx spectabilis, which is usually sold interchangeably as Chakte Kok. A third, botanically unrelated wood (Erythroxylaceæ family), that bears an uncanny similarity in nearly every respect to the 2 different species is Erythroxylon Havanese, that is most ordinarily sold as Redheart.

 

Laboratory tests have shown Redheart to be moderately durable to attack by insects, pests decay, and fungi. Other than the quality health risks related to working with any variety of wood dust, no additional severe health reactions are associated with Redheart.

 

Specification

 

Common name

This wood is also known as Redheart, Chakte Kok, Acotillo, Chakte Coc, Honduras Redwood, and Zapotillo

 

Scientific name

Erythroxylum spp. and Simira spp.

 

Distribution 

This tree is mainly found in Southern Mexico to southern Brazil and sometimes in Paraguay.

 

Tree size

This tree can reach up to a height of 50-65 ft (15-20 m) tall, and a trunk diameter of 1-1.5 ft (.3-.5 m).

 

Average dried weight

The average dried weight of this wood is about 40 lbs/ft3 (640 kg/m3).

 

Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): 0.52, 0.64

 

Janka Hardness: 1,210 lbf (5,380 N)

 

Color and Appearance 

Anyone can simply guess why this wood is named Redheart. In some instances freshly surfaced Redheart is a bright, watermelon red though the color will vary in intensity and hue from board to board: anywhere from a light-weight orange/pink, (similar to Pink Ivory), to a darker brown-red. In some cases, it will look quite like Bloodwood, although sometimes with a lot of visible and patterned grain pattern. Redheart’s vivacious color quickly fades to a reddish-brown in direct daylight, although this color change is slowed (but typically not stopped entirely) by employing a finish with UV inhibitors and keeping the wood aloof from strong lighting.

 

Grain and Texture:

The grain pattern on this wood is sometimes straight or irregular, with a fine, to virtually an excellent texture. The wood encompasses a low to a medium natural luster because of the less content of natural oils. Diffuse-porous; little to terribly little pores organized preponderantly in radial multiples of 2-5; growth rings indistinct; rays not visible while not lens; parenchyma varies by species: typically rare or absent, or vasicentric and weak alary (winged).

 

Workability:

Redheart has smart operating characteristics, and planes, machines, and sands well. This wood has a fine to a medium texture which makes it rather very easy to work with both hand tools and with machines. 

 Redheart is difficult lumber to dry, but when cured properly, it makes beautiful furniture. Turns glues, and finishes well, although a brown color shift is to be expected. It responds to stains and glues very well because of the less content of natural oils.

 

Odor:

Redheart gives off a characteristic and distinct, rubber-like smell once being worked depending on the kind of species.

 

Availability:

The wood on the market is out there in the form of narrow boards however they are most typically available in the form of turning boards. The cost of this wood tends to be slightly on the medium to the high facet for associate foreign hardwood. So far this wood species is not listed within the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of threatened species.

 

Common Uses

The wood is used to create turned objects, inlays, veneer, fine article of furniture, musical instruments, box making, and tiny specialty wood items.

Redwood additionally makes very high-quality guitar soundboards, extremely resonate solid bodies, and beautiful, intensely patterned topnotch for electrical guitars.

 

Frequently asked questions

 

What is red heart wood? 

Redheart is a distinctive Central / South American exotic tropical hardwood with uninteresting pink to moderately bright red colored wood fades considerably with long exposure to ultraviolet radiation. With its generally gorgeous aesthetic qualities, redheart has been a well-liked turning wood; it is starting to appear a lot frequently in custom guitar building (necks, fretboards, etc.), also.

 

Where is red heart wood from? 

This tree is mainly found in Southern Mexico to southern Brazil and sometimes in Paraguay.



References

https://www.wood-database.com/redheart/

https://www.rarewoodsusa.com/product/redheart/  

https://www.bellforestproducts.com/redheart/

https://www.hearnehardwoods.com/redheart-lumber-2/

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