Swamp Ash

Swamp Ash

Introduction

The term “Swamp Ash” does not talk to any specific species of ash (Fraxinus genus), but it is mostly used by luthiers to clarify light-weight wood yielded from ash trees that area units sometimes found in wet or sloughy areas.

Fraxinus caroliniana might be a standard name for several North yank trees inside the genus Fraxinus which may grow in swamps and various wetlands. Like downy ash, green ash, water ash, etc. The wood of swamp ashes is relatively low in density and is utilized inside the development of musical instruments, considerably electrical guitars.

Green Ash is one in each of several species inside the genus Fraxinus genus that area unit used as business lumber. its strength/mechanical properties are that the area unit very close to the connected White Ash (Fraxinus americana) and are usually mixed and sold as “White Ash.”

Green Ash has wondrous shock resistance, and at the facet of hickory (Carya spp.), it's one in each of the foremost unremarkably used hardwoods for tool handles in North America—particularly in shovels and hammers where toughness and impact resistance is extremely vital.

When stained, ash can look very a similar as oak (Quercus spp.), tho' oaks have a great deal of wider rays, that area unit visible on all wood surfaces—even on flat sawn surfaces, where they appear as short, skinny brown lines between the growth rings. Ashes lack these conspicuous rays.

The wood of this specific tree is rated as perishable, or exclusively slightly durable concerning decay. Ash is also not proof against insect attack.

The main drawback concerning this tree is that the ash inside the genus Fraxinus genus has been per cause skin irritation and a decrease in viscus performance whereas in operation with it. Therefore factories handling this wood have to be compelled to have correct clearance and certification from the government.

Specification

Common names

Swamp Ash, Punky Ash, Guitar Ash, Instrument Ash

Scientific Name

Fraxinus caroliniana

Distribution

North America (Southern)

Dried Weight

The average weight of this wood is 32LB/cubic foot.

Janka Hardness Rating

1310

Tree Size

Fraxinus caroliniana might be a touch tree concerning forty feet.

Color

The wood might be a light-weight to medium brown color. wood is very wide, and tends to be a beige or light-weight brown; not invariably clearly or sharply demarcated from wood.

Texture

It's a medium to coarse texture similar to oak. The grain is invariably straight and regular, though generally curly or lentiginose boards are found.

Workability

Produces wise results with hand or machine tools. Responds well to steam bending. Glues, stains, and finishes well. this is {often|This can be} often because of regular grains gift in them.

Odor

Gives off a precise, moderately unpleasant smell even once being worked on.

Availability

Ash is among the least quantity expensive utility hardwoods on the market domestically; it has to be compelled to compare equally to oak in terms of value.

This wood species is not listed inside the CITES Appendices II but is on the IUCN Red List. It's listed as critically vulnerable because of a projected population reduction of over eightieth inside the following three generations, caused by the results of introduced taxa, overharvesting, prohibited work, and lack of conservation ways to require care of the population species.

Common uses

Flooring, millwork, boxes/crates, baseball balmy, and various turned objects like tool handles.

Swamp Ash vs Alder

Ash on the one hand may be a robust and dense hardwood that shows straight grain and light-weight color. Sonically it produces a lot of trebles and sensible sustain which ends up in a very brighter and a lot of pronounced tone than other tonewoods. Fraxinus caroliniana specifically is lighter than its relative Northern Ash and has larger, open pores. It produces chiming highs, clear midrange, and powerful low finish that lets higher overtones ring through, leading to bigger harmonic content.

Alder on the opposite hand produces an awful resonant and balanced tone with the higher midrange pushing through further as nice sustain and further attack. thanks to its closed pores and shut grain, it finishes alright and is sometimes finished in solid colors.

Ultimately, the competition between Ash and Alder may be a shut one;

Both styles of wood give a balanced tone that's brighter than most alternative hardwoods. Cosmetically, Ash encompasses a lot of inconsistent however straight and visual grain that appears nice with natural and clear finishes whereas Alder's tight grain is a smaller amount visible however terribly consistent and is sometimes finished in solid colors.

Sonically, Alder can turn out a lot of attack and presence with its emphasized upper-mids, leading to it sounding a touch bit punchier than Ash. Ash can offer you a comparable rounder and slightly mellower tone with chiming highs that aren’t too bright.

Ash stringed instrument Body

Guitars with an ash body can have less bite within the midrange however can have a pleasant twang and sensible sustain. Back within the days, individuals used Fraxinus caroliniana that may be a softer wood that made a far hotter tone, however, northern ash is additionally used and encompasses a bright, singing high sound.

Best wood for guitar Body

Choosing the wood for the stringed instrument body is incredibly vital and plenty of factors like the look, weight, tonality, etc, ought to be taken into thought. whereas taking into thought the preceding criteria we regularly realize that every wood has its benefits and downsides. Some woods may be sensible at sure things however they could have one thing lacking.

Below given are the qualities of some woods that may build them sensible for building a stringed instrument.

Alder: this can be a usually used, light-weight wood that produces a full sound and clean tone and is employed to create Stratocasters for Fender. Its lightweight tan color and marginal distinct lines of grain build it a decent wood for solid color ended as against a transparent finish.

Ash: This wood comes in a very harder type, Northern, and a lighter selection, Southern. The more durable Northern ash offers the stringed instrument a bright tone and long support, whereas the softer Southern ash encompasses a cooler, lighter sound that's quite balanced.

Maple: For stringed instrument bodies, each of the laborious and soft maple varieties is used. Aside from being straightforward to end and extremely strong, Maple offers a bright tone at the side of the robust property.

Rosewood: For Stratocaster heads, an awfully serious wood, rosewood, like alder, offers a heated sound with a swish high finish.

Korina: Korina's sound is incredibly dry, resonant, and balanced with nice clarity, rhythm, and property.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Fraxinus caroliniana wood?

The term “Swamp Ash” doesn't ask any explicit species of ash (Fraxinus genus), however, sometimes|is mostly} utilized by luthiers to explain light-weight wood yielded from ash trees that area unit usually found in wet or marshy areas.

Where to shop for Swamp ash wood?

https://exoticwoodzone.com/

Which is lighter/heavier Swamp ash or alder?

Taken on the average, Alder is that the lighter weight of the 2 forms of wood. Ash comes in 2 varieties: Northern laborious Ash and Fraxinus caroliniana. Northern laborious Ash is that the heavier of the 2. Fraxinus caroliniana is often lighter. Of course, the weight will vary for these woods, counting on several factors.

Where will Swamp ash return from?

Swamp ash could be a common name for many North Yankee trees within the Magnoliopsida genus which can grow in swamps and alternative wetlands.

Where do Fraxinus caroliniana trees grow?

Native to the southeastern u. s. and Cuba. hoop ash, native to the northeastern u. s. and Japanese North American country. downy ash, generally distributed in North America east of the chain of mountains.

What is heavier Fraxinus caroliniana or alder?

Taken on the average, Alder is that the lighter weight of the 2 forms of wood. Ash comes in 2 varieties: Northern laborious Ash and Fraxinus caroliniana. Northern laborious Ash is that the heavier of the 2. Fraxinus caroliniana is often lighter. Of course, the weight will vary for these woods, counting on several factors.

How to grain fill swamp ash?

Begin by employing a sand block. A water-based filler dries rather quickly, however it provides it nightlong to dry and shrink in. after many filling sessions, you will see that the grain is all crammed. At that time, you'll stain it, then oil finishes it.

How to finish a Swamp ash stringed instrument body?

  • Brush the wood with a brass brush to open the pores of the wood.
  • Sand the wood with 100/120/150/220.
  • Color the wood.
  • Fill the grain with a grain filler.
  • Apply a pair of to three coats of Vinyl Sealer
  • Sand with four hundred grit sandpaper between every coat.
  • Finish with three to four coats of instrument Lacquer.

How to identify Swamp ash?

With a placing similarity thereto of oak, ash will be a troublesome species to spot. It's familiar for its sturdiness and use in myriad hand-held items of apparatus, starting from tool handles and baseball insane to hockey sticks, oars, and paddles. The foremost common varieties of ash trees will be separated into 2 basic categories: white ash and Fraxinus nigra.

White ash grows from the geographic area through the geographic region of u. s. and includes a lighter wood color and wider-spaced growth rings than Fraxinus nigra, which includes a slightly darker hardwood. Fraxinus nigra is often found from the geographic area up into Japanese North American countries and includes a light- to medium brown wood. Its wood will have wide spacing between growth rings that tends to be beige or brown and may mix in with the wood.

How laborious is swamp ash?

White ash wood, the one most typically employed in a piece of furniture, measures 1320 on the Janka scale. This puts it right below maple and oak, that sit at one,450 Janka and one,360 Janka, severally. However, its superior oak tree, walnut, and cherry, creating it one in every of the foremost sturdy choices out there for the fine piece of furniture.

How will Fraxinus caroliniana sound?

Swamp ash particularly is lighter than its relative Northern Ash and has larger open pores. It produces chiming highs, clear midrange, and robust low finish that lets higher overtones ring through, leading to bigger harmonic content. Ash can provide you with a comparable rounder and slightly mellower tone with chiming highs that aren’t too bright.

Reference

https://www.wood-database.com/swamp-ash/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraxinus_pennsylvanica

https://flypaper.soundfly.com/features/guitar-anatomy-fundamentals-guitar-wood-types/

https://www.quora.com/Whats-the-best-wood-for-electric-guitars

https://www.unofficialwarmoth.com/index.php?topic=1291.0

https://ardec.ca/en/forums/2805/solid-body-guitar-finishing

https://www.commercialforestproducts.com/good-swamp-ash/

Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out