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Snakewood

 Snakewood_Exotic_Wood_Zone
 Common Name This wood is also known by Snakewood, Letterwood, Amourette, Speckled wood, and Leopardwood. It is called letterwood because such patterns found on the wood are often so pronounced that it's been compared to the writing of hieroglyphics, and is therefore usually referred to as Letterwood.
Scientific Name Brosimum guianense (syn. Piratinera guianensis)
Distribution Snakewood comes from a small, relatively rare tree found in the Coastal regions of northeast South America, Central, and South America.
Tree Size The Snakewood can reach a height of about 65-80 ft (20-25 m) tall with a trunk diameter of about 6-12 in (15-30 cm).
Dried Weight ( average ) 76 lbs/ft3 (1,210 kg/m3)
Specific Gravity 96, 1.21
Janka Hardness 3,800 lbf (16,900 N)

 


No doubt that this tropical, dense, hardwood is called Snakewood because of the splotches and spots that resemble the characteristic snakeskin-like pattern. Originating from the forests of Central and South America, this tree is of the same family as that of the mulberry. The Snakewood tree is small and slender growing only up to a foot in diameter and 40-60 feet tall. 

This wood is also known by some very interesting names due to different reasons. Its Latin name means Guiana sea pirate. Such patterns found on the wood are often so pronounced that it's been compared to the writing of hieroglyphics, and is therefore usually referred to as Letterwood.

Snakewood is reported to be exceptionally sturdy and additionally resistant to the attack of insects and pests. Although it is not commonly utilized in exterior applications wherever durability would be a problem. This wood is quite challenging to work with, hard to cut, splits rather easily and difficult to drill into them for nails and screws. This wood has a high blunting effect on the cutters and tools used on them with time. Therefore really sharp and efficient tools should be used. Apart from that this wood turns well and polishes to a beautiful finish. But on the downside, it does take some time to dry and may be easily subjected to cracking while doing so.

The Snakewood dust if not properly taken care of can cause some serious health issues. The Snakewood dust is said to be fine and toxic. It can cause nausea and other respiratory irritations. In addition to its colorful figure, snakewood is additionally among the densest and hardest of all wood species worldwide. 

 

Color and Appearance: Due to the characteristic snakeskin patterns on the wood, it can be easily understood why this wood is called Snakewood. Wood is usually a reddish-brown, with different darker brown or black patches. Color tends to darken and homogenize with age and exposure. As this wood darkens with age the snake-like patterns tend to become more discreet. This process is completely normal in exotic woods. The darkening of the wood due to age can be prevented by using some protective coating along with the finish.

Grain and Texture : The grain is straight, with a fine even texture. With a high natural luster which makes the process of polishing simple. Diffuse-porous; solitary and radial multiples; medium to massive pores in no specific arrangement; few; tyloses mineral/gum deposits common; parenchyma winged and confluent; slender rays, traditional spacing.

Workability : Being closely associated with Bloodwood, snakewood shares several of constant operating properties; particularly, the wood is extraordinarily dense and features a pronounced blunting result on cutters and tools. It is hard to cur and difficult to drill. Snakewood additionally tends to be quite brittle and might splinter simply while being worked. Despite the difficulties of operating it, snakewood turns well and finishes to a high polish.

Odor : The Snakewood gives out a delicate scent once being worked on. This scent is said to be similar to that of the scent of the Boldwood tree.

Availability : As a rare and tiny tree, costs for surfaced and polished snakewood that show the characteristic snakeskin pattern are maybe the foremost price of any exotic lumber worldwide in terms of per-board foot value. Less patterned sections of the wood are sometimes sold for a lot of lower costs (under the name Amourette). Snakewood is additionally unremarkably sold fully and half log forms, which generally embrace important pith checking and areas of each patterned and non-figured wood, which might lead to high wastage. This wood species isn't listed within the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of vulnerable species.

Common UsesThere is a varying amount of figure in each tree so each log can produce very different grades of lumber. Uses include violin bows, parasols, canes, pens, bottle stoppers, umbrella handles, pool cues, fishing pole butts, and more! Primarily found in Suriname. Inlay, veneer, bowed stringed instrument bows, tool handles, and different tiny turned or specialty objects. Sonically this wood is an excellent tonewood. It is said to produce similar sounds like that of musical instruments made from Ebony.

Few finished products images

Knife Handle Made By Snakewood
Bowl Made By Snakewood

Frequently asked Questions

 

Due to the characteristic snakeskin patterns on the wood, it may be simply understood why this wood is named snakewood. Wood is sometimes an auburn, with completely different darker brown or black patches. Color tends to darken and homogenize with age and exposure. As this wood darkens with age the snake-like patterns tend to become a lot more discreet. This method is normal in exotic woods. The darkening of the wood thanks to age may be prevented by using some protecting coating together with the finish. The snakewood tree is a small and slender, growing only up to a foot in diameter and 40-60 feet tall. The snakewood also can reach a height of approximately 65-80 ft (20-25 m) tall with a trunk diameter of about 6-12 in (15-30 cm).

 

There is a variable quantity of figure in every tree therefore every log will turn out as completely different grades of lumber. Uses include violin bows, parasols, canes, pens, bottle stoppers, umbrella handles, pool cues, fishing pole butts, and more! Primarily found in the South American nation. An inlay, veneer, bowed instrument bows, tool handles, and completely different small turned or specialty objects. Sonically this wood is a superb tonewood. it is said to supply similar sounds like that of musical instruments made of Ebony. though it's not usually used in exterior applications where sturdiness would be a drag.

 

Snakewood is a tropical American tree that has timber with a snakeskin pattern, used for ornamental work. it is the common name of many species of completely different plants. Out of that Brosimum guianense is the species that used for lumber functions worldwide. Its Latin name means Guiana sea pirate.

 

Snakewood comes from a small, comparatively rare tree found within the forests of Central and South America and is reportedly somewhat brittle and troublesome to figure, however well worth the effort. This tree prefers to grow in tropical climates than that of dry climates.

 

Visit https://exoticwoodzone.com/ to shop for this food in lumber, veneer, or any kind that's needed.

 

Snakewood comes from a little, comparatively rare tree found within the Coastal regions of northeast South America, Central, and South America.

 

Premium items of snakewood are overpriced as a result of having figures throughout the blank and on all four sides is difficult to come by. As a rare and small tree, prices for surfaced and polished snakewood that show the characteristic snakeskin pattern are perhaps the foremost worth of any exotic lumber worldwide in terms of per-board foot worth. Less patterned sections of the wood are generally sold for heaps of lower prices (under the name Amourette).


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