Macacauba

Macacauba

Introduction

 

The Macacauba may be a wood of the many names. It is known by totally different names betting on the place and therefore the use of the wood. As an example, it's known as Macacauba or Macawood once used or sold-out as lumber. It is generally known as Orange agate to assist sell the wood. Hormigo is employed more commonly and it is used once specialty applications like turning and building of musical instruments are concerned. Once Hormigo is employed, a suffix is used in conjunction with it to denote the color of the wood. Hormigo Negro is employed to denoting darker species and Hormigo Rojo is employed to denoting orangish-red species. The ambiguous name granadillo is additionally generally applied to the current wood (along with dozens of alternative species).

The popularity of the Macacauba wood grew hugely once it was being used as a replacement for Brazilian rosewood twenty five years ago as an export ban was placed on this wood. This Macacauba wood could be a sensible replacement for the Brazilian rosewood as a result of it had such a big amount of similar characteristics of the Rosewoods, however, it was not as oily.

Heartwood is rated as durable to very sturdy concerning decay resistance, with sensible resistance to the attack of insects and pests. The heartwood color is often extremely variable, starting from a bright red to a darker reddish or purplish brown, often with darker stripes. The sapwood is differentiated from the heartwood because it is of a far lighter shade of yellow to white.

The Macacauba wood is a wonderful choice because it works well with each hand operation moreover as machine operations. although care should be taken while operating with areas where the grains are in an interlocking pattern because it could cause tear out. This wood turns and glues very well and results with a high luster.

Besides the quality health risks related to any sort of wood dust, no health reactions are associated while operating with the Macacauba wood. This wood is fairly sustainable and isn't listed within the CITES appendix or the IUCN red list of vulnerable species apart from one Costa Rican species. It is said that solely but 2,500 mature people are present and will soon cease to become extinct.



Specification

 

Common name

This wood can be also known by Macacauba, Macawood, Hormigo, Orange Agate, Kunatepi, Vermelha, Nambar, Beati, Bastado, Doekaliballi, Koenatepi, Macawood, Macacauba, Preta, Trebol, Caoba, Bois De Mora, Dukalaballi, Vencola, and Hormigo. But these names do have a clear dominance. Referred to as Macacauba or Macawood when used or sold in lumber form. Sometimes called Orange agate to help sell this wood. Hormigo is used more commonly and it is used when specialty applications like turning and building of musical instruments are involved. When Hormigo is used, a suffix is used along with it to denote the color of the wood. Hormigo Negro is used to denoting darker species and Hormigo Rojo is used to denoting orangish-red species.

 

Scientific name

Platymiscium spp.

(P. dimorphandrum, P. pinnatum, P. trinitatis, P. ulei)

 

Distribution

This tree grows at low altitudes, in moist and also dry climates, especially in the shade-loving primary forest. It may grow on degraded, mineral deprived soil or poorly drained soil. This tree originates from Central and South America, Mexico, down to the Brazilian Amazon region.

 

Tree Size

The tree can reach a height of 65-80 ft (20-25 m) tall, with a trunk diameter of 2-3 ft (.6-1.0 m).

 

Dried weight

The average dried weight of the wood is about 59 lbs/ft3 (950 kg/m3).

 

Color and Appearance

Heartwood color can be highly variable, ranging from a bright red to a darker reddish or purplish brown, frequently with darker stripes. The sapwood is differentiated from the heartwood as it is of a much lighter shade of yellow to white. When the wood is referred to as “Hormigo,” various suffixes are used to describe the heartwood color: “Hormigo Negro” for darker pieces or “Hormigo Rojo” for orangish-red pieces.

 

Grain and Texture

The grain is straight to interlocked, with a medium to a fine texture. The fine texture makes it easier to work with, but when handling the interlocked grains care must be taken as it may cause tear out. Even though it does not have as much oil content as that of Rosewoods it does have its very own fair share of high natural luster. Diffuse-porous; large pores in no specific arrangement; solitary and radial multiples of 2-3; heartwood mineral/gum deposits (yellow) occasionally present; growth rings indistinct; narrow rays not visible without lens, fairly close to close spacing; parenchyma lozenge, confluent, and banded (not marginal).

 

Workability

Overall, good working characteristics for both hand and machine tools, though areas of interlocked grain should be approached with care to avoid tear out. Able to take a very high natural polish. Turns and glues well. It also has a high degree of chatoyance that often emerges after sanding.

 

Odor

No characteristic odor is given out by this wood even while working with it.



Availability

Commonly imported under a variety of common names and in several forms (lumber, turning blanks, flooring, etc.). Expect prices to be moderate for an imported exotic hardwood. Macacauba is not listed in the CITES Appendices or on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, although a single Costa Rican species, Platymiscium pleiostachyum, is listed as endangered. The species is estimated to have less than 2,500 mature individuals still living, and the population is estimated to continue to decline at least 20% over the next two generations. This species has been exploited at a very high rate for lumber in the past, but there’s no indication that it’s been exported internationally.

 

Common Uses 

This wood has pleasing aesthetics and great finishing properties which is why this wood is often in great demand by the guitar and furniture builders alike. Macacauba is commonly used to make furniture, cabinetry, veneer, musical instruments, turned objects, and small specialty wood items. The species fixes nitrogen in the soil, making it useful for agroforestry purposes.



Frequently asked Questions 

 

Where does macacauba wood come from?

Granadillo is a beautiful, dense, fine-textured, tropical hardwood from Central America, Mexico, Central America down to the Brazilian Amazon region. The heartwood color is a dark reddish-brown. It is used for both veneers and lumber and can be figured.

 

Where is macacauba wood grown?

This tree grows at low altitudes, in moist and also dry climates, especially in the shade-loving primary forest. It may grow on degraded, mineral deprived soil or poorly drained soil.

This wood can be grown in Mexico, Central America, and northern South America, Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Venezuela, the Guyanas; Caribbean - Trinidad.

 

References

https://www.wood-database.com/macacauba/

https://bacowood.com/portfolios/kunatepi-macacauba

https://www.rarewoodsusa.com/product/hormigo/

http://panatrees.com/macacauba/

http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/macacauba.htm

http://hobbithouseinc.com/personal/woodpics/macacauba.htm

https://savagewoods.com/granadillo-wood/



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