« Go Back

African Mahogany

 African Mahogany Species Guide
 Common Name African Mahogany,  It is known by a number of other common names, including Nyasaland, red or white mahogany. Oos-Afrikaanse mahonie is the Afrikaans name and acajou is its name in French.
Scientific Name Khaya spp. (Khaya anthotheca, K. grandifoliola, K. ivorensis, K. senegalensis)
Distribution It is widespread, occurring from Guinea Bissau east to Uganda and Tanzania, and south to Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique. It is fairly wide-grown in plantations within its natural space of distribution, however additionally in South Africa, tropical Asia, and tropical America. It is simply confused with alternative Khaya species like K. grandifoliola, K. senegalensis, or K. ivorensis within the north of its natural range.
Tree Size The African mahogany can grow up to a height of about 100-130 ft (30-40 m) tall, with a trunk diameter of about 3-5 ft (1-1.5 m).
Dried Weight ( average ) 40 lbs/ft3 (640 kg/m3).
Specific Gravity (Basic, 12% MC): .52, .64
Janka Hardness 1,070 lbf (4,760 N)

 


African Mahogany could be a wood that is continuing to grow in popularity so much so that this new millennium has seen its numerous species being naturalized in tropical regions in Central America, also as turning into a recent plantation listing addition. Comprising a handful of species from the Khaya genus, all of which are native to Africa. Every of the wood ranges in color from a pale pink or muted orange to a somewhat darker reddish- or golden-brown. Generally lacks the deeper auburn color and sturdiness that is common for true mahogany in the Swietenia genus. Botanically, Khaya may be a part of the Meliaceæ family, that not solely includes mahoganies, however also Sapele (Entandrophragma cylindricum), and a number of different commercial species. The African mahogany is widely considered to be a sound substitute for Honduran Mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla), otherwise called “Genuine Mahogany.”

The mahogany is rated as moderately sturdy to the effect of moisture, and decay because of age. This wood additionally encompasses a moderate to poor resistance to the attack of insects or borers. Though severe reaction is kind of uncommon, African mahogany has been reported as an activator. Sometimes commonest reactions merely include eye and skin irritation. Hence correct equipment is to be used while working with this wood.

Color and Appearance: The heartwood color of this wood is variable, starting from very pale pink to a deeper reddish-brown, typically with streaks of medium to dark reddish-brown. Color tends to darken with age. This can be thanks to prolonged exposure to daylight. It is found that the quartersawn surfaces may exhibit a ribbon-stripe look.

Grain and Texture: The grain is straight to interlocked, with a medium to coarse texture. Good natural luster with a light-refracting optical phenomenon called chatoyancy. That is thanks to smart natural oil content within the wood. Diffuse-porous; giant to very giant pores, very few; solitary and radial multiples; orange or brown deposits sometimes present; growth rings sometimes blurred, although typically distinct thanks to terminal parenchyma; rays medium to wide, fairly shut spacing; parenchyma scanty to vasicentric, and sometimes marginal (not typical for Khaya spp.).

Workability: This wood is fairly easy to figure with. It glues pretty well, and responds well to stains and finish. Tearout can sometimes cause an issue whereas working with this wood only if the grain is interlocked in grain pattern.

Odor: There is no characteristic odor made whereas operating with this wood. Apart from the fact that on mature trees, white scented flowers are borne at the ends of the branches.

Availability: The African mahogany is readily available in a variety of lumber sizes, Costs as plywood and veneer. costs are low to moderate for a foreign hardwood This wood species isn't listed within the CITES Appendices, however is on the IUCN Red List. it's listed as vulnerable thanks to a population reduction of over 20% within the past 3 generations, caused by a decline in its natural range, exploitation, banned harvest, and illegal merchandising of wood each in its raw form as well as finished merchandise form. it's usually cut down and destroyed in East and West Africa. Planting new trees in these areas to form up for what was destroyed is extremely rare. Genetic erosion is assumed to have occurred as well. owing to this, the species is listed as "vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List. a number of its populations are offered protection, and a few countries placed bans on its export. The foliage is consumed by the larvae of the moth Heteronygmia dissimilis.

Common Uses: It is used for the article of furniture, flooring, paneling, veneer, plywood, turned items, boatbuilding, and interior trim, and for the musical instruments (e.g. guitar). It is an appropriate tree for these projects because the bark weathers well, is immune to borers and termites, besides flora decay, and is hard however saws well. The bark features a bitter taste that is commonly used as a medication for common colds. The oil from the seeds may be rubbed into a person's scalp to obviate insects and lice.

African Mahogany Miniature
African Mahogany Guitar Body
African Mahogany Turning Wood Blanks

Frequently asked Questions

 

Lacquer is a prime alternative for finishing any form of mahogany. Lacquer dries quickly, is durable, and does not have that plastic feeling that's leftover once shellac or varnish is employed. With solely 2 coats of lacquer, mahogany is sealed for good.

 

Janka Hardness 1,070 lbf (4,760 N) The softest however still very close to utile.

 

In order to start out propagating mahogany seeds, your first step is getting some seeds. The seeds grow in woody brown capsules which will grow to 7 inches (18 cm.) long. Look on and beneath the trees in your neighborhood in January through March. Once you have collected a number of seed pods, dry them for a number of days in newspapers. After they crack open, shake out the limited brown seeds from within. Let these dry a couple of more days then prepare to start growing tree seedlings.

Put sandy soil in little pots and moisten it totally. Then press a seed gently into every pot. If you're hoping for tree seedlings, you’ll want to keep the soil dampish while you're propagating mahogany seeds. cover every pot with wrapper and water them once the soil dries out. Position the pots in a warm spot with some indirect light. You will see the seeds germinating during a few weeks. At that time, take away the plastic and bit by bit expose the little tree seedlings to more and more sun. Transplant after they are some 8 inches (20 cm.) tall.

 

There are lots and lots of ways to finish mahogany. Your initial choice is whether or not to fill pores or not. A formal piece of furniture tends to require filled pores. stuffed pores additionally imply a fill-finish on top, and usually, some kind of stain, even if nothing quite tinting the pore filler to match the coloration you wish. A casual piece of furniture will look nice with open pores. Within the wood finishes, generally, an oil/varnish combination could be used. You will be able to additionally use a light film finish, like a wiping varnish, though a heavy film finishes without pore filling tends to appear quite unattractive.

Mahogany may be left natural without stain or without more than a light dye to drag the assorted tones along. However, if antique appearance is sought-after, mahogany may be quite dark. It also can be treated to form the sort of highlights that are seen on some depository pieces of furniture from many centuries past.

 

It is used for the article of piece of furniture, flooring, paneling, veneer, plywood, turned things, boatbuilding, and interior trim, and for the musical instruments (e.g. guitar). It's an applicable tree for these projects as a result of the bark weathers well, is resistant to borers and termites, besides flora decay, and is difficult but saws well. The bark options a bitter style that's unremarkably used as a drug for common colds. The oil from the seeds could also be rubbed into an individual's scalp to obviate insects and lice.

 

The wood color of this wood is variable, ranging from terribly pale pink to a deeper achromatic, generally with streaks of medium to dark achromatic. Color tends to darken with age. This will be because of prolonged exposure to sunlight. It is found that the quartersawn surfaces could exhibit a ribbon-stripe look.

 

Its color will vary from a pale pink or muted orange to a somewhat darker reddish- or golden-brown. It also can have darker marking, and, esthetically, it may be more increased through reckoning (ribbon; wavy diagonal; mottled) and ranging levels of chatoyance.

 

It is widespread, occurring from Guinea national capital east to Uganda and Tanzania, and south to Angola, Zambia, Zimbabwe, and Mozambique. it's fairly wide-grown in plantations at intervals its natural house of distribution, but in addition in South Africa, tropical Asia, and tropical America. It's merely confused with different Khaya species like K. grandifoliola, K. senegalensis, or K. ivorensis at intervals north of its natural range.

 

Visit https://exoticwoodzone.com/ to know more about African mahogany and many other wood and to place your orders. 

 

Sale

Unavailable

Sold Out